Daily Posting: Pushing Creative Boundaries or a Recipe for Burnout?

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Posting diverse daily content has been something that I’ve tried to achieve in 2017, because I though it would push me to create something daily. If you haven’t already noticed, I have an informal posting schedule that I’ve created to keep myself accountable with posting on social media. I know that it sounds ridiculous, but I work better when I have deadlines for myself. In short, I post four Instagram photos, two short Instagram videos, one blog post that I usually post at the beginning of the week (either on Tuesday or Wednesday) and one YouTube video (usually posted on Thursdays) each week. For others, this may not seem like much, but for someone who has a full time job, this schedule becomes a bit more absurd considering that at some point, I do need to sleep. At the beginning of the year, I thought this schedule would push my creative boundaries, but now that we’re half way through the year, I feel exhausted and creatively drained. I guess you could call it burnout.

 

 

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I know what you’re saying to yourself as you read this, “Job, why don’t you just stop and take a break?” and to that I say, “I want to, but maybe I shouldn’t.” It’s difficult to explain but I guess I should try and break this down. Ever since my Job’s Journal Instagram account (@jobsjournal) started to gain a following, I was shocked and excited that a.) people were interested in what I was creating and b.) so many others had the same interests as I did. Fast forward to last summer, when my outlook on my Instagram account started to change. At this point, I hit 20 000 followers on Instagram, and many of my friends were starting to find out about this little secret account that I tried so hard to keep from all of them. They were shocked and excited for me when they found out about my Job’s Journal Instagram account, but many of them were also questioning why I haven’t leveraged the “success” of the Job’s Journal “brand” into something larger.

 

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I would be lying if I didn’t think about expanding Job’s Journal, but up until that point, I didn’t care about expansion because it was just a fun hobby that I had. After hitting 20K followers, I thought it was time to start expanding Job’s Journal, but I only made that decision because I was interested in learning new skills (like blogging, web design and video editing) and growing creatively. Creating different content across various platforms was something I ended up enjoying, and by 2017, I was creating and posting content everyday through my various social media accounts. It was evident that when I started posting more frequently and consistently, growth started to follow too. Sure, its fun to see social media numbers (i.e. followers, subscribers, and likes) grow, but at some point in the year, I became too obsessed with growth and I felt that posting daily was the only way to satiate my hunger for growth. To be blunt, it worked. I posted daily, and my numbers increased, but what was the expense to all that growth. That hunger for growth did not last very long because it was routed in something bogus and insincere. I never thought of myself as a competitive person, but when I started playing the numbers game on Instagram and YouTube, I realized that I was becoming a very competitive person. As I have said, that growth-obsessed phase didn’t last long because I was chasing something that was so meaningless and I came back to my senses. Community over competition was a hashtag that I saw people throwing around on Instagram for the longest time, and it was only until I became so obsessed with competition and comparing numbers that that phrase finally made sense. I cannot tell you how much that phrase resonated and still resonates with me after my mini growth-obsessed phase.

 

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While I wasn’t so obsessed with growth anymore, I still didn’t let go of my makeshift posting schedule because it was so ingrained into my daily routine. I would come home from work, then do some journaling or painting, then I would photograph my creation for that day and then post it on social media. I’ve been so accustomed to that schedule that when I do give myself a day of grace, or pre-plan/edit my post for the day, I feel a little bit off because my daily routine has been thrown off. Well now, the story’s a little bit different. Maybe I’m just over reacting, but I’m honestly burned out. My imaginary deadlines have taken a toll on me and there are some days I dread posting photos or videos because it’s become a sort of chore. Don’t get me wrong though, I still love creating journal spreads, art and practicing calligraphy/brush lettering, but sometimes I feel like I’m not creating things to express myself, but rather I’m creating things so I can post about it on social media. I know that’s dangerous, and that’s why I took a break for the past four days and I didn’t pressure myself to post anything on social media.

 

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After those four days, I felt refreshed and was excited to share what I’ve done and what I’ve created. If there’s something that I learned from that break, it’s that daily posting keeps you accountable to create, but it can also burn you out. From this point onward, I’m going to be much easier on myself. I do find joy in sharing tidbits of my life and my creations on the internet, but I’m going to be more conscientious about how often I do it. I don’t want end up hating journaling, art and brush lettering because I pushed myself to post about it too much. Like a good doctor always says, everything in moderation.

 

Thank you so much for reading. I’ve been having a great time writing about different topics that I’ve never really written about on YouTube or Instagram. If there’s a topic you would like me to cover, leave a comment down below. See you all next week!

Cheers,

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